New Holiday Clip-Art Mini Package

This year, as a special holiday offering we’re releasing a mini-package of seasonal clip-art with images based on mortised advertising cuts from the early 1900s. The images are based on printers oranments which would have originally been sold individually as brass plates to be inserted into a typeset page.

The seasonal images include lots of Santa images, trees, wreaths, bells, candles and all of the images associated with the holiday season, many of them in both monochrome and simple multi-color versions, with a charming vintage look. They are perfect for embellishing holiday cards or making labels for presents.  Many even include open space in the design for addresses or names.

The package consists of 9 large-size pages of images, exactly as preserved in the printer’s type sample book from which they are drawn, published over 100 years ago. They are in high-resolution and should be printable with crisp output at fairly large sizes. The mini-package is only $10 and can be ordered online for immediate download from >OUR STORE in plenty of time for the holidays.

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in: Art Collections, Collections, Holiday · tagged: ,

7 comments on “New Holiday Clip-Art Mini Package

  1. Michael

    Can these be separated into their original morticed elements for spot-color printing or are they composite artwork only? Thanks!

  2. Anonymous

    Interesting question, Michael.  They are composite images, but if you have minimal Photoshop skills it would be very easy to separate the colors into distinct images like the original mortised elements because the colors are very distinct and physically slightly separate.  The color selection tool or even the magic wand would do the job.

    Dave

  3. Anonymous

    Interesting question, Michael.  They are composite images, but if you have minimal Photoshop skills it would be very easy to separate the colors into distinct images like the original mortised elements because the colors are very distinct and physically slightly separate.  The color selection tool or even the magic wand would do the job.

    Dave

  4. Michael

    OK, so any separations would be manual on my end. That’s what I was wondering about. I was wondering because I own a letterpress and am planning on making photopolymer plates for it. Digital art of old-fashioned cuts is therefore high on my list of useful things. Thanks for the info!

  5. Michael

    OK, so any separations would be manual on my end. That’s what I was wondering about. I was wondering because I own a letterpress and am planning on making photopolymer plates for it. Digital art of old-fashioned cuts is therefore high on my list of useful things. Thanks for the info!

  6. Anonymous

    Very cool that you own a letterpress.  I’d love to pick your brain sometime about the best materials and methods for making photopolymer plates.  I wrote some initial articles and in the new year I hope to move on to building a working press, mostly for posters.

  7. Michael Hurley

    Thanks! I’m probably not the best person to ask about making plates and such, though, as I’ve yet to make even one yet (or even my plate maker)! I just bought my first press right before Christmas and managed to crank out a small run of holiday cards using vintage cuts and foundry type, but that’s so far the only thing I’ve ever printed. I’m hardly what you could call an expert.

    If you’re interested, there’s a Yahoo group dedicated to making photopolymer plates for letterpress work. There’s also the Letpress list that’s a general purpose letterpress mailing list.

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